Category Archives: book cover design

Using Createspace to Self-Publish: Creating a book cover

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On Createspace, you’ll find a tool called Cover Creator (guess what it does?), and within this tool, you’ll discover three basic options for creating your book cover. In this post, I’m going to go over those three options and briefly discuss the pros and cons of each one. Then, I’m going to explain the less-than-efficient way that I created the cover for my book, ALL THE DIFFERENT WAYS LOVE CAN FEEL.

Kindle book cover for ALL THE DIFFERENT WAYS LOVE CAN FEEL
Kindle book cover for ALL THE DIFFERENT WAYS LOVE CAN FEEL

Option #1: Use one of the free templates provided.  First off, let me say Cover Creator is pretty great–it’s totally easy to use and even fun, and I’m not a tech guy.  Now: the free templates. There are, as best I could tell, about 35 different templates to choose from, and within each template, you can customize the text, font, size, color, layout, and a bunch of other things, too.  The templates themselves are quite generic, and I wouldn’t recommend choosing one without really customizing it.  (Note: regardless of whatever template you choose, you can upload images–JPEG files–and have them be a part of the cover. They just need to be 300 DPI (dots per image) or higher. And, of course, make sure whatever image you use, you have secured the proper rights to it.)

One of the templates allows for you to, essentially, upload a completed front cover and a completed back cover. That is what I did. Well, sort of.  More on that shortly.

Pros: this option is free; user-friendly; fast.

Cons: templates are generic; formatting can be tricky, especially when it comes to uploading a 300 DPI photo.

Check out this helpful YouTube video; it provides a demonstration on how to use Cover Creator. 

Option #2: Upload a completed book cover to Createspace. This option allows a user to make a one-sheet book cover (front, spine, back), save it as a PDF, and upload it to Cover Creator. In the beginning of my book cover creation process, I chose this option. But, despite much effort, I could never get the cover to come out exactly the way I wanted it, so I circled back to the templates and found the one where you can upload whatever front and back cover you wanted.

Pros: allows for a completely customized book cover; you control every aspect of design.

Cons: formatting is very tricky; compared to using the free templates, this option is really difficult to use (to me, at least).

Option #3: Pay Createspace for a book cover.  For a customized book cover, it’ll run you $399, which, after a bit of research, I learned is pretty standard. (Note: when 280 Steps went out of business, I asked them how much they wanted for the rights to use the ALPHABET LAND book cover, which I really loved. Memory serves, they quoted me a price of $325.) I read a bit about how this option works, and, as I understand it, Createspace sends you a detailed worksheet filled with questions about your book and your preferences regarding art, font, text, etc for the book cover. They then take that information, create a cover, and you approve it (or ask for more changes/tweaks). When you’re satisfied, you do a final approval, and your cover is ready. Not sure about the timeline for the process, but, per their website, Createspace employs lots and lots of book cover designers, and they’re the experienced professionals. Honestly, it sounded all right. . .if you got the money.  Me, I didn’t want to pay. Plus, I wanted to figure it out myself.

Pros: you don’t have to make your own cover; you work with experienced book designers.

Cons: expensive.

easy way

My Cover

Let me preface this by saying up front that I am terrible at following instructions.  And taking advice. And recognizing, once I’ve already started down an untenable path, that I should start over or change lanes.

I said all that to say this: how I created my book cover is definitely not the most efficient way to do things. Consider yourself warned.

So, with my disclaimer complete, let me begin. The first thing I did was create a free account with Canva, which bills itself as “amazingly simple graphic design software.” On Canva, I created a front cover for ALL THE DIFFERENT WAYS LOVE CAN FEEL. Using one of the free templates, I found a public domain image, cropped and edited it to suit my taste, and pasted it directly onto Canva. Next, I created a back cover on Canva, this time using a different template, but one that, I felt, fit the overall ascetic I was going for. All that was easy. Took me very little time. . .

Then came the fun part. On Canva, you can share your book cover on social media and email, no problem.  But if you want to save your book cover, it must be saved as a PNG (portable network graphics).  Createspace will not accept PNG files, so I had to convert the PNG file to a JPEG, and in order to do that, I had to find a free converter online (click here to see the one I used.) Once that was done, I chose the free template on Cover Creator that allows you to upload a front and back cover image; I uploaded the JPEGs I’d created on Canva, and voila. Except it took several tries (I’d guess around eleven, maybe fifteen) before I got the margins and formatting approved by Createspace.